Important parts and cost of DIY racing quadcopter project

Building Racing Quadcopter CREDIT: charlottefpv.com

Building Racing Quadcopter CREDIT: charlottefpv.com

FPV racing, is quickly gaining momentum among the drone fanatics across the globe. Though at a very nascent stage, it’s the speed and the adventure that’s catching up with the enthusiasts. Isn’t it fun to match the speed of your DIY racing mini quad with your buddy’s?

The racing quadcopter scenario has only grown over the years. And now, it’s being organized at an international level. However, it’s the 250 quadcopter that gained popularity in the racing scene. They replaced the 450 sized drones, earlier used by the FPV racing enthusiasts.

The mini quads beat the larger ones in grit and swiftness. It’s all about how hefty is the quadcopter. The lesser it weighs, the quicker it is. Even if they crash more often, all that breaks are the propellers. The best part is, that the props are easily replaceable.

For anyone who is budget bound, 250 racing quadcopter are the best option for DIY. What appeals to them is that even if the quadcopter crashes, it still flies after petty repairs. So it means that they not just offer you some quick moves and easy to fix, but are also budget friendly.

The 250 racing quadcopters require very less space to fly. They are also relatively cheaper. The smaller batteries help reduce the cost of the DIY project to a larger extent. However, if you are a beginner and starting from scratch, building racing quadcopter it can cost you anywhere between $1000 and $2000. So you should be mentally prepared for this shock for the start.

Except the frame of the quad, all the other parts add up to the cost. A good FPV structure, powerful batteries (C rated), a moderate radio and a charger is a must. On top of that if you do not want the rims of the quad to be crushed, you need good quality antennas with plastic armors.

Spending on a FPV camera, along with fragile antennas (1.2ghz) is a must. While a Lumenier 1806 frame would cost you around $310 approx, an Openpilot Kwad frame would cost you anywhere from $195 to $229. But that’s just an example of quality frames. So, if you want it in your budget you can refer to the list below for your DIY racing quadcopter project.

Frames – from $8 to $166
FPV Camera – from $30 to $47
Video Transmitter – from $18 to $70
FPV Video Antenna – from $8 to $68
Batteries – from $11 to $23

Radio Transmitter – from $21 to $200
Monitor/Goggles – from $30 to $549
Flight Controller – from $25 to $130
Propellers – from $2 to $30
On Screen Display (OSD) – from $9 to $11

FPV Recording Camera – from $40 to $500
Voltage Regulator – from $3 to $70
Electronic Speed Controller (ESC) – from $8 to $19

A Lipo Battery charger can cost you around $20 approx. It’s the cheapest that you can get your hands on. These are the most important parts of the project. However, there are many other parts that you need as well. If you are on a real tight budget, even then you can build racing quadcopter within $400. But, if you are a real racing quad fanatic, we suggest you look at quality than the cost for a happy flying experience.

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